Neil Manel Frau-Cortes' blog on music, Judaism and new technologies

Posts tagged ‘musicians’

5 Reasons Why Jewish Musicians Should Network: the Shalshelet Experience

Today my good friend Cantor Jill Pakman sent me a link to a video presentation of last Shalshelet festival in New York city. I’ve been honored to participate in the last two Shalshelet festivals, and lucky to have two of my compositions awarded and published there. (At the bottom of this post I’ll insert the presentation video as well as that of my piece for this year).

In any case, this presentation reminded me of the Shalshelet experience and made me reflect on Jewish musicians and composers, and how much we need to network. Shalshelet is an international festival that happens every other year. Composers and musicians from everywhere present their work at a main concert, as well as at a number of workshops. Other than the performances themselves, it is a great opportunity to connect with other people involved in Jewish music across borders and denominations. But why should we, as Jewish composers and musicians, care so much about networking and participate in events like Shalshelet. Here is my take, reduced to 5 main reasons:

1. Creating tradition: To me, this is the first and foremost reason. Unlike what most people believe, a good part of the “traditional” melodies we use at shul are not traditional at all. Our grand-parents would not recognize the eclectic mosaic of liturgical melodies we call “traditional” today. That includes hassidic music from the 1970s, Naomi Shemer, or Debbie Friedman, z”l. How can your music become the new tradition? Only by being shared and used by other cantors, song leaders, etc.

2. Diffusion of your work: Admittedly, unlike Christian rock, Jewish liturgical music doesn’t have many forums and doesn’t get much exposition in mainstream media. Major media are oblivious to our music and, if they ever touch the subject, it is only to offer a very partial, biased view of a couple of styles and standards, not of the whole panoply and richness of the Jewish musical universe.

3. Learning from others: We shouldn’t even have to mention that. Unfortunately, the smaller our entourage, the more we find artists that choose to measure up to the wrong models. Or maybe they just do not look up to other models but to themselves, secure as they are of their own artistic ways. I think this is particularly true in certain small and endogamic Jewish circles. There’s nothing as pernicious to art as misplaced artistic self-efficacy. (No, that’s not you, so stop worrying now 🙂 )

4. Collaboration. Let’s face it, generally Jewish music doesn’t make money. Most of us simply have no budget to hire session musicians for our recordings and for our performances.  However, cultivating your network is the key for having the collaboration of great Jewish musicians in your projects. I’ve been blessed with such opportunity in my last recording, and certainly look forward to repeat the experience with more and more projects, mine and other people’s.

5. Finding new venues for what you do. My immediate community is well aware that I perform Sephardic music and lecture (in more than one sense) about its history. Of course, I don’t feel the same ease and “authority” to play Yiddish ballads, for instance. Only by networking I can bring my music to another venue and get to know what you do, so I can invite you to talk and perform in my area.

So go ahead, network, network, network. We have amazing technologies at our fingertips. Let’s put them to good use. And let’s support great networking experiences such as Shalshelet.

Closing this  rather long post, here you have the videos. First, the Shalshelet presentation, with yours truly briefly talking at 2:39.

And here’s my piece, awarded in last Shalshelet. Sorry for the quality of the recording.